At what age did you learned cooking?

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bleakheart26

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Was searching up since one of characters had in mind didn't know how to cook even thu in late twenties; mostly they buy quick cheap instant meals. Not sure how realistic is that but (maybe will switch it up to they do know how cook just simple few dishes but they resort to boxed foods for quicker time since they're busy).

What age did you learned how to cook? Like make a few dishes (besides cooking rice) and can cook a meal so you won't starve?
Excluding instant meals that just need boiled water and microwavable meals.
started learning to cook in boy scouts so i don't even remember what age that was, but it wasn't just them that taught me something. I tried to learn from everyone. Best thing about it was getting a chance to taste as people taught. Great way to reinforce learning and what does or does not work. But I was reasonably capable to make steak, potatoes' (several types), corn, several additional dishes like prepared salad dish+ others. before age 13. Not just edible but actually taste good. Shrimp, cake or other such things cooked to completion with other food to accompany it. So today I don't bat an eye at leak soup, brown rice gumbo Laya, or something else by memory. I also don't count warming pizza, hotdog, or a pack of ramen noodle soup as actual cooking. Sure if you throw in some other stuff then your doing more than taking something and heating till it's done. Even scrambled eggs are more involved than toss a dog in the microwave/ boil it/ grill it/ or cut it in two and cook it in a skillet. But that's just me. I'd rather have a nice omelet style sandwich potentially with a crescent rolls. But I know people who really don't know how to make anything other than a microwave dog, or order fast food.
Learning basics and repeating it (recipe x) just a few times was plenty of experience to become competent (repeatability made good) in making about any generic dish as a youth. It was only a matter of learning how to duplicate the previous experience to end up with the same result. Or in cases of over cook, how to cook less.. ect. I hope that explains my experience in it.
I think having a cooked meal with people you like is so much more gratifying though...
 
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DarkeReises

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I'm Asian and if we don't want to be disappointments to our family, we have to know how to cook rice at a very young age.
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Anyways, I learned how to make eggs at 9 (under heavy observation and restrictions) and I still can't cook rice since my family doesn't trust me not to burn down the house
My one friend is forbidden from doing anything except boiling water.

I can probably cook if i tried and followed instructions. I can atleast make eggs though. Maybe when I was like 12? Just cause i never bothered to when I was younger. My grandmother apparently had some history in culinary and my mom used to have a culinary license or whatever, but that was ages ago. So i could always ask and i have been offered to learn how to cook.
 

Jemini

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As several people here have said, it kinda depends on what you call cooking. I believe the definition of cooking actually requires heat to be used in the process, and the heat has to come from something other than an oven or else it is considered baking.

Going by this definition, I was cooking pasta by age 10. That is unsupervised. I was cooking it for my own meals when my mom was busy with work. That is probably a level where nobody is going to gripe about whether or not that counts as cooking.

Going back a little further, I was cooking ramen by age 7. That's actual stove-top cooking to heat the water, although all there really is is just sticking the noodles and the flavor packets in the water from there. So, that's still cooking by most people's reckoning.

When I was 4, my mother was sick in bed. I made her some toast for breakfast in bed because I wanted to help out and take care of her. This meets some definitions of cooking in the most technical sense, but I feel most people would argue against it.
 

Ai-chan

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The first time Ai-chan cook was probably 11 or 12. Only learned how to cook rice and sunny side egg. Ai-chan has learned a lot more recipes now.

And recently, Ai-chan found out the secrets to cracking open an egg one-handed entirely by accident. That's Michelin-level sh - shut the fridge right there!
 

yansusustories

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I think it can be realistic if there's an explanation for it in place. I grew up with a SAHM for most of my childhood so she would cook and we never had to feed ourselves. After moving out for uni, there wasn't really a need to either because, well, meals at university are subsidized here so really cheap (like, cheaper than a microwaveable meal in some cases) and the quality wasn't that bad either. As a student on a budget, it just made sense to eat there instead. So I actually only learned how to cook in my mid-twenties. Funnily enough, that was after moving back home to my parents.

ETA: With "cooking" I mean making an actual meal. I think that as long as you're not intellectually challenged/can't read, everybody can cook some noodles or rice or similar stuff without being taught how to since the instructions are on the packaging and just need to be followed.
 
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MR.DANTE

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For recipes it was around 7, at 8 I could cook pasta, rice, fried potatoes, steaks, eggs, grilled meat and vegetables, salads, and could also tend and cook fishes ( I could fish decently at that age and my father taught me to tend my catch at 5 or 6), I also washed the dishes and prepared the table for the meal, everyone should do at list that much in my opinion.
If you ask me about cooking in general it's a bit different, knowing how to make a list of dishes with a passable results doesn't mean you can cook, cooking mean you can prepare what you want with little trouble and have ok results at your first or second try, I never cooked a pizza or prepared an octopus salad but I'm sure I could pull it of decently first try if I decide to do it, that is what qualify you as a cook, I think I was 10 or something when I could do this, still I hate cooking and do it as little as possible
 
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I don't technically know how to cook. I've never really tried, except for fried egg sandwiches and deviled eggs. Things that don't really require a whole lot of effort. I feel like I could manage a real meal if I tried, but... Trying is too much effort. That probably won't change for the next ten years, so presumably your character is 'realistic' though hard to believe.

You could also just make them capable of burning water like a normal non-anime protagonist.

I think it can be realistic if there's an explanation for it in place. I grew up with a SAHM for most of my childhood so she would cook and we never had to feed ourselves. After moving out for uni, there wasn't really a need to either because, well, meals at university are subsidized here so really cheap (like, cheaper than a microwaveable meal in some cases) and the quality wasn't that bad either. As a student on a budget, it just made sense to eat there instead. So I actually only learned how to cook in my mid-twenties. Funnily enough, that was after moving back home to my parents.

ETA: With "cooking" I mean making an actual meal. I think that as long as you're not intellectually challenged/can't read, everybody can cook some noodles or rice or similar stuff without being taught how to since the instructions are on the packaging and just need to be followed.
Thanks for the advice. For this character, they were an orphan, their aunt took them in and she was the one who cooked most meals at home. Their mother passed away when they were young and their dad was not really there. But after the Aunt passed away, their Uncle and cousin kicked him out. So I think I'll make them be able to cook some basic dishes but most time during their early twenties was working with not much time in between so they always prefer instant quick meals. So mostly a preference here.

Another character I thought off but because they just graduated from HS and their parents always cooked for them at home, and they never had to cook before. Feels this one may not be too much of a stretch, since they just turned 18 and always relied on their parents. Their parents are a but protective of them too; only child.
 

OfficiallyZoe

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I've been cooking literally as long as I can remember. First it was simple stuff, like making pasta with a plain sauce, but then I went into more elaborate stuff.

I was about six or seven before Mom let me use a knife, though, and I was supervised in everything until I was ten or so.
 

AliceHiess

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I started heating frozen meals in the oven when I was like 12 if you don’t consider that cooking I think I started actual cooking like making pizza on my own at around 15 or 16. However I cooked things like cake with my parents help when I was around 6 or so. I can do more advanced stuff I’m just lazy so I usually make frozen meals or grab something from the pantry when I need to eat. As another person said as long as you consider following instructions cooking then most people without a disability can cook. I’m advanced enough that I know how to improvise without totally ruining the food but I couldn’t make something completely from scratch without the aid of a recipe as a starting point. Unless it’s simple like putting together a sandwich.
 
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AlexaLee

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I mean, I think it's a little rare but I started cooking for myself at the age of 8 because I didn't want to eat meat anymore and my mom thought by telling me I'd need to cook for myself it would make me just deal with it but I actually preferred it. But then on the other hand, my friend didn't learn to cook for herself until we reached university because her parents always cooked for her so she had no need to/no opportunity to learn.
 

bulmabriefs144

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Was searching up since one of characters had in mind didn't know how to cook even thu in late twenties; mostly they buy quick cheap instant meals. Not sure how realistic is that but (maybe will switch it up to they do know how cook just simple few dishes but they resort to boxed foods for quicker time since they're busy).

What age did you learned how to cook? Like make a few dishes (besides cooking rice) and can cook a meal so you won't starve?
Excluding instant meals that just need boiled water and microwavable meals.
Cooking can be learned at any age, but if you don't live in a restaurant, your parents will probably cook for you most of your childhood. I learned to cook a few dishes around 16 or 17, I think. Did a bit more cooking in college. I've never been a great cook, preferring to make quick meals like ramen.
 

K5Rakitan

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This morning, I made a big smoothie for breakfast, gave some to my husband, put some in a feeder for my baby, and brought the rest next door to my mom. My dad can't handle too much sugar, and fruit has a bunch of sugar, so I didn't offer any to him. My baby is still mostly drinking my milk, but the pediatrician said we should start giving him small portions of other food to reduce his chance of developing allergies.


Cooking and watching Baby at the same time is tough, so I have simplified my cooking a lot lately. I have a huge tuna casserole I made in a slow cooker that's currently in the refrigerator. Once we finish that and have an empty slow cooker again, I'm going to make some of this with store-bought paneer:
I've made my own paneer in the past, and it is much better than store-bought paneer, but it takes too much time to do it myself these days.
 

K5Rakitan

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Living alone, i had to learn cooking or else i will depend on fast food deliveries which arent cheap
We buy stuff in bulk to save money. I have a giant can of nacho cheese I plan to open soon. We'll use some and freeze the rest. Last time I did that though, the can ruined two can openers. I have more heavy-duty can openers now, so wish me luck!
 

bleakheart26

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The first time Ai-chan cook was probably 11 or 12. Only learned how to cook rice and sunny side egg. Ai-chan has learned a lot more recipes now.

And recently, Ai-chan found out the secrets to cracking open an egg one-handed entirely by accident. That's Michelin-level sh - shut the fridge right there!
/blush
yea, i can crack an egg in one hand.... that's not too hard to do. but I'm likely to have a fair amount of egg in that hand.....
 
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