Does anyone have list of all the flaws that a character can have

Mechaphobic

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I feel like flaws are rarely so monolithic, an example being someone who is very detail-oriented. Let's say that they pay attention to every little mistake they see, and then they get a job at an assembly line, what seemed like a good trait will not cause them to waste a lot of time as they feel they need to fix every little mistake even when they don't affect anything. Too often do people bring up traits but then never give any real test to them. If you want to create some cool situations you should test their strengths and weaknesses constantly and then make their strengths their weaknesses in certain situations.
 

RedHunter2296

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I think that weaknesses are an essential part so that readers can better understand the characters. For what the answer would be yes, I have almost a complete paragraph on each character's sheet about some flaws and how they would behave in case they run into them.

After all, if the new Star Wars trilogy envisioned something for me, it is how much people hate perfect beings without fail that everything that happens badly is the fault of others but not of themselves.

Besides that such problems are capable of creating really interesting situations. As an extremely racist superman who has to rescue a school of people of color, that would create a great suspense for the reader, who will wonder what he would do in this situation, if he leaves them there or if he rescues them despite his hatred. He may rescue them but will not treat them the same as someone who needs help.
 

K5Rakitan

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One person's strength is another person's flaw. Lying can get you in trouble if you're not good at it. Honesty can get you in trouble if you are too good at it.
 

Darkcrow.

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Flaws are easy to make up with. Make them dumb, or physically weak, or addicted to something, or have a McGuffin stuffed up their ass that explodes in a time limit unless something is done with it. Those can be called flaws, but honestly speaking, they will be a pain in the ass to write. If your character flaw is just something you pulled out of the bucket to prevent your MC from looking like a Mary Sue, then you might as well just write a Mary Sue, because nothing is more infuriating than a character who can CLEARLY curb-stomp their way into a story be blindsided by some stupid flaw like "can't talk to women" or "has a phobia of the colour red".

Imagine Rey Skywalker from the nu-Star Wars trilogy being afraid of dust. I'd rather take the current Rey than that made-up version of Rey because AT LEAST the former can get shit done while the latter is the writer's poor attempt at balancing the character when all it really amounts to is filling in the blank on the other side of the scale.

You can make character flaws all you like. It's as easy as rolling a -phobia dice and see what you land on. What you should be focusing on is making a character flaw relative to your story's theme, or character goal. Is the theme of your story about letting go of the past? Then make your MC hold grudges harder than elephant glue. Is your character a rookie cop trying to unravel a conspiracy in the seedy underbelly of the justice system? Make the rookie cop a guy who's way too trusting and naive, then write your way out from there. Is it a story about greed? Then make your character, well, greedy. Is your story about finding one's true self? Then make your character a turbulent, narcissistic piece of shit who has to make amends for his own mistake.

Theme is king in a story. I've said this so many times that I've gone past being a broken record and became a literary equivalent of the CIA MKULTRA project. Pinpoint and understand the objective of your story and the relevant plot points, story beats, and the tonality that goes with it. After doing that, think of a crutch that not only elevates the theme of the story but props up the rest of said story's elements too.

For example, I'm making a story about a robot wanting to know what it's like to be human. The theme of the story is the exploration of the human condition through a third-party's lens. I'm going to establish 3 tones now: a dreaded, nihilistic tone, and a hopeless, comedic tone.

For the first tone, I'll construct a flaw that highlights the conclusion that I want to reach. The MC's flaw is that his naivety leads him to believe that human-made movies are the perfect reference for his research on the human condition. Thus, he acts out the Seven Deadly Sins in all seven arcs, highlighting the worst of human atrocities. He commits murder, rape, torture, manslaughter, theft, robbery, lies, with a heavy dose of violence throughout, all according to the action movies he sees, because it is what he believes to be human. In the end, the MC finds a kick out of it, with the kick being a feeling of comfortable repetition every time he does something reprehensible. He thus reaches that conclusion that he has understood the human condition via human sins, and continues to do so until his battery runs out or water gets into his circuit or some bullshit like that. It not only elevates the nihilistic tone but also reinforces the theme of the story.

For the second tone, we'll make that MC a clueless sod who takes things too literally. When people reference having butterflies in his stomach, he literally goes out of his way and does that, leading to some antics. When a character states that they're on cloud nine, the MC constructs an aerial apparatus capable of sending man to the stratosphere, just to experience what said character felt. It also reinforces the theme, but it presents itself in a different tone, suitable for the story told.

Don't just make a flaw because you feel like it'll make your character complete. Make parameters. Figure out what drives your story, and construct a character that'll make that drive a worthwhile experience.
Just by reading your little summary, I am already hooked to your story. I wonder when you are planning to publish the book.
 

SerikoLee

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Character Flaws examples
A. Too Dense
B. Too focused on one thing
C. Delights in suffering of others
 
D

Deleted member 45782

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Well I am not looking for a pervert character. I am looking for a sensible character who have already lived his life and is in his mid 50s

Even though it’s a good flaw, It doesn’t suits my character who is a battle harden veteran. Readers will not take him seriously.
Depends what flaws. Personality? Physical? Mental? Flaws as in what other characters see that character as, like they don't fit the ideals of the society at that time, even thought they are just fine and dandy in this time?

If your character is a veteran and in his mid 50's, possible flaws (or maybe not flaws, but something they may struggle with and have to overcome?)
- Hatred/Grudges like someone said. If he had to fight against certain groups, and constant conflict/bad experiences with them (losing his fallen teammates to them) has led him to view all as bad, even though not all are. And those grudges may set him back and he has to overcome it.
- Stubbornness perhaps from years of experience so not willing to open to possible new solutions/ways/etc.
- PTSD and how he copes with it. Like whether he lashes out or does some other thing to make it go away (for ex: drinking away the memories)
- Paranoia and distrust everyone (seen too many things so jaded in a way), even those closest to him which can also possibly pushed them away
- Perhaps some injury from his battles. Maybe a physical injury that really limits him to what he can do now versus before, and he has to cope with it. Ex: amputation. Now has to get used to a prosthetic limb ever since he lost his dominant arm. Or ex: Nerve pain. Some damage to his body from his battle worn days and he never quite fully haled and recovered from it, so the pain sometimes flare up again and again. Loss of hearing from being in near vicinity of explosives going off and now he can't hear as well. Etc.
 
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Jemini

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The title says everything. (I want to keep it short.)
Err... keep it short? I think you need to completely re-evaluate what a character flaw is before you ask this question again.

A character flaw is, simply enough, anything and everything that is a feature of the character that causes them hardship or challenges. The list of things that can accomplish this is as extensive and varied as the creativity of the writers creating these characters, and I am certain there will always be some creative authors out there adding to the list even as we speak.

Also, you may have heard that character flaws make a character more interesting. This is wrong. What makes a character interesting is how they deal with the flaws that they have. The way that they overcome challenges reveals something about their character and adds depth. And, if those challenges come from them having to overcome something about themselves then it is so much the better. Or, in some cases, maybe they are failing to overcome something about themselves and that is making the external challenges they are facing a lot more onerous than it would be for most other people. That is also interesting in it's own right, and a character who is failing to deal with their own character flaws and having a harder life for it is definitely something that can be called "dealing with the flaw." They "deal" with it badly, and they let it overwhelm them and harm them.
 

Cipiteca396

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Well I am not looking for a pervert character. I am looking for a sensible character who have already lived his life and is in his mid 50s

Even though it’s a good flaw, It doesn’t suits my character who is a battle harden veteran. Readers will not take him seriously.
Loyalty. Your character has served honorably and does not regret any actions he took in that service.

Now though, some of those actions are causing him trouble in the time that should have been his opportunity to experience peace. Even worse, everything he thought he worked to protect is turned against him.

No matter what, he won't betray the ideals he was loyal to... Even if it leads to his ruin.
 

Derin_Edala

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A list of... all the flaws? Flaws are usually contextual. In the vast majority of cases, whether something is a strength or a flaw depends on the situation. Any character trait can be a flaw, so there are rather a lot.
 
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